Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Hershner v. NC Dept. of Administration

Court of Appeals of North Carolina

March 4, 2014

Millie E. HERSHNER, Petitioner,
v.
NC DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION and The NC Human Relations Commission, Respondent.

Heard in the Court of Appeals 11 December 2013.

Page 848

Appeal by respondent from order entered 11 January 2013 by Judge Paul C. Ridgeway in Wake County Superior Court.

John Walter Bryant and Amber J. Ivie, Raleigh, for petitioner-appellee.

Roy Cooper, Attorney General, by Ann Stone, Assistant Attorney General, for respondent-appellant.

STEELMAN, Judge.

Where unchallenged findings of fact support the decisions of the administrative law judge and state personnel commission, the trial court did not err in adopting their findings of fact and conclusions of law. Where respondent failed at trial to present evidence to support the alleged bases for petitioner's termination, the trial court did not err in affirming the decisions of the administrative law judge and state personnel commission that petitioner's termination was wrongful. Where the state personnel commission had a quorum at the time it commenced business, it was authorized to issue a decision.

I. Factual and Procedural Background

Millie Hershner (petitioner) was employed by the North Carolina Department of Administration (DOA), Human Relations Committee (HRC) (collectively, respondent) as a staff attorney. Citizens who believe their rights under the Fair Housing Act have been violated can file complaints with the HRC. As part of her employment duties, petitioner assisted investigators in these cases and helped to determine whether HRC should hear them.

In 2005, petitioner was hired as an Attorney I for respondent. She was selected for this position over another applicant, Richard Boulden. In 2006, Boulden was selected for an Attorney II position, making him petitioner's supervisor. Prior to 2006, petitioner had only one disagreement with Boulden. At the time, Boulden, a case investigator, had determined that a case had cause, while petitioner determined that it did not. Subsequent to his promotion, Boulden did not train petitioner, or meet with her to establish any kind of work plan or standards, as required by respondent's " Performance Management System." However, on Boulden's first review of petitioner's work, he gave her a negative performance rating. Petitioner subsequently advised Boulden that he could not rate her performance negatively without stating the basis for the rating; Boulden then amended the performance ratings, so that they were positive, but in the lower range.

Following the low rating, petitioner contacted the complainants in cases on which she had previously worked. One such complainant, Virginia Radcliffe (Radcliffe), had threatened to sue HRC. On 3 January 2008, Boulden contacted Radcliffe, informed her that HRC was no longer working on her case, and told her that he would be the sole point of contact between Radcliffe and respondent.

Page 849

Boulden claimed at the hearing that he had overheard petitioner speaking with Radcliffe on the telephone later that day, although he did not raise the issue with petitioner at the time.

On 9 June 2008, Boulden informed petitioner of a disciplinary meeting concerning her conversation with Radcliffe on 3 January 2008. On 11 June 2008, petitioner received a Final Written Warning for unacceptable personal conduct, specifically insubordination, with regard to her continued contact with Radcliffe. This letter outlined five numbered rules that petitioner had been expected to follow. There was no evidence presented that petitioner had violated any of these rules, or that petitioner had any subsequent contact with Radcliffe.

On 24 August 2009, petitioner was dismissed for unacceptable personal conduct, including conduct unbecoming a State employee that was detrimental to State service, violation of a known work rule, and insubordination. Specifically, three acts were alleged as the basis for this dismissal: (1) petitioner sent two letters to Radcliffe, containing allegedly confidential information; (2) petitioner contacted Stephanie Williams (Williams), another complainant, and informed her that she believed Williams' case had " cause," before a final determination had been made by HRC; and (3) petitioner had been instructed to work on a single assignment, to the exclusion of others, and yet continued to work on other assignments. John Campbell, Executive Director of HRC (Campbell) admitted that petitioner was not fired due to a failure to meet expectations, a failure to do her job, or unsuccessful job performance due to lack of skill or effort. Further, an HRC Supervising ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.