Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Horner International Co. v. McKoy

Court of Appeals of North Carolina

March 4, 2014

HORNER INTERNATIONAL COMPANY, Plaintiff,
v.
Bill M. McKOY, Defendant.

Heard in the Court of Appeals 8 January 2014.

Page 853

[Copyrighted Material Omitted]

Page 854

Appeal by Plaintiff and cross-appeal by Defendant from preliminary injunction entered 14 June 2013 by Judge G. Bryan Collins in Wake County Superior Court.

Wallace & Nordan, L.L.P., Raleigh, by John R. Wallace and Joseph A. Newsome, for Plaintiff.

Robinson Bradshaw & Hinson, P.A., Chapel Hill, by J. Dickson Phillips and Brian L. Church, for Defendant.

STEPHENS, Judge.

Procedural History and Factual Background

This case concerns the grant in part and denial in part of a motion for a preliminary injunction in a dispute between a company and its former employee. Plaintiff Horner International Company manufactures flavor materials for use in tobacco and food products. Defendant Bill M. McKoy was employed by Plaintiff from May 2006 until October 2012. In 2006, Defendant, who had worked in the food processing and flavor industry since the early 1980s, assisted Plaintiff with setting up a new manufacturing plant in Durham and served as plant manager thereafter. In May 2006, Defendant signed a Non-Competition Agreement (" NCA" ) and Agreement Not to Disclose Trade Secrets (" ANDTS" ) as conditions of his employment with Plaintiff. Defendant resigned from Plaintiff on 8 October 2012 and, thereafter, began employment with Teawolf, LLC, a Delaware Limited Liability Company with its principal place of business in New Jersey. Defendant's work for Teawolf involves installing, maintaining, and optimizing equipment used in the production of new flavor products. Both Plaintiff and Teawolf sell flavor materials derived from cocoa, chocolate, coffee, tea, fenugreek, ginseng, and chamomile.

On 20 May 2013, Plaintiff filed (1) a complaint; (2) a motion for temporary restraining order (" TRO" ), preliminary injunction, and permanent injunction; and (3) a motion for an order allowing expedited discovery of Defendant. The motions for TRO and expedited discovery were allowed on 22 May 2013, and Defendant was restrained from violating the NCA and ANDTS. Following a hearing on the motion for preliminary injunction in early June 2013, the trial court entered an order on 14 June 2013, nunc pro tunc, to 4 June 2013, which enjoined Defendant from disclosing Plaintiff's confidential information and trade secrets, but denied the motion as to the NCA. On 27 June 2013, Plaintiff filed notice of appeal from the trial court's denial of the preliminary injunction as to the NCA. On 8 July 2013, Defendant filed notice of cross-appeal from the grant of the preliminary injunction as to Plaintiff's confidential information and trade secrets.

Grounds for Appellate Review

Preliminary injunctions are " interlocutory and thus generally not immediately reviewable. An appeal may be proper, however, in cases, including those involving trade secrets and non-compete agreements, where

Page 855

the denial of the injunction deprives the appellant of a substantial right which he would lose absent review prior to final determination." VisionAIR, Inc. v. James, 167 N.C.App. 504, 507, 606 S.E.2d 359, 361 (2004) (citations and internal quotation marks omitted).

The purpose of a preliminary injunction is ordinarily to preserve the status quo pending trial on the merits. Its issuance is a matter of discretion to be exercised by the hearing judge after a careful balancing of the equities. Its impact is temporary and lasts no longer than the pendency of the action. Its decree bears no precedent to guide the final determination of the rights of the parties. In form, purpose, and effect, it is purely interlocutory. Thus, the threshold question presented by a purported appeal from an order granting a preliminary injunction is whether the appellant has been deprived of any substantial right which might be lost should the order escape appellate review before final judgment.

A.E.P. Indus., Inc. v. McClure, 308 N.C. 393, 400, 302 S.E.2d 754, 759 (1983) (citation and internal quotation marks omitted). Our Supreme Court went on to hold that

where time is of the essence, the appellate process is not the procedural mechanism best suited for resolving the dispute. The parties would be better advised to seek a final determination on the merits at the earliest possible time. Nevertheless, [where a] case presents an important question affecting the respective rights of employers and employees who choose to execute agreements involving covenants not to compete, [appellate courts should] address the issues.

Id. at 401, 302 S.E.2d at 759. We believe the same reasoning applies to agreements between an employer and employee regarding protection of the employer's alleged trade secrets. Accordingly, we address the merits of both Plaintiff's appeal and Defendant's cross-appeal.

Discussion

In its appeal, Plaintiff argues that the trial court erred in denying its motion for a preliminary injunction as to the NCA, contending that (1) a non-compete agreement can be properly enforced by means of a preliminary injunction and (2) the NCA is valid and enforceable. In his cross-appeal, Defendant argues that the court erred in enjoining him from disclosure of Plaintiff's confidential information and trade secrets, contending that (1) Plaintiff failed to sufficiently identify the trade secrets allegedly at risk of disclosure, (2) Defendant's mere " opportunity to misappropriate" cannot support the court's determination of Plaintiff's likelihood of success on the merits of its claims, and (3) the preliminary injunction entered was too " broad and nebulous." As discussed herein, we affirm.

I. Standard of Review

As a general rule, a preliminary injunction is an extraordinary measure taken by a court to preserve the status quo of the parties during litigation. It will be issued only (1) if a plaintiff is able to show likelihood of success on the merits of his case and (2) if a plaintiff is likely to sustain irreparable loss unless the injunction is issued, or if, in the opinion of the Court, issuance is necessary for the protection of a plaintiff's rights during the course of litigation.
Id.

" The standard of review from a preliminary injunction is essentially de novo." VisionAIR, Inc., 167 N.C.App. at 507, 606 S.E.2d at 362 (citation and internal quotation marks omitted). Thus, " on appeal from an order of a superior court granting or denying a preliminary injunction, an appellate court is not bound by the findings, but may review and weigh the evidence and find facts for itself." A.E.P. Indus., Inc., 308 N.C. at 402, 302 S.E.2d at 760 (citation omitted). " Nevertheless[,] a trial court's ruling on a motion for a preliminary injunction is presumed to be correct, and the party challenging the ruling bears the burden of showing it was erroneous." VisionAIR, Inc., 167 N.C.App. at 507, 606 S.E.2d at 362 (citation and internal quotation marks omitted).

Page 856

II. Plaintiff's Appeal

Plaintiff argues that the trial court erred in denying its motion for a preliminary injunction as to the NCA, contending that (1) non-compete agreements may be properly enforced by means of a preliminary injunction and (2) the NCA is valid and enforceable. While Plaintiff's first contention is correct, we disagree with the second.

Plaintiff asserts that this Court should reverse the denial of its motion and remand for entry of a preliminary injunction as to the NCA, citing the ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.