Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

State v. Robinson

Court of Appeals of North Carolina

September 5, 2017

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, Plaintiff,
v.
CHARLES BERNARD ROBINSON, Defendant.

          Heard in the Court of Appeals 10 August 2017.

         Appeal by defendant from judgment entered 19 February 2016 by Judge R. Gregory Horne in Mecklenburg County Nos. 14 CRS 224971, 225816, and 43298 Superior Court.

          Attorney General Joshua H. Stein, by Assistant Attorney General Martin T. McCracken, for the State.

          Appellate Defender Glenn Gerding, by Assistant Appellate Defender Hannah H. Love, for defendant-appellant.

          ZACHARY, Judge.

         Charles Bernard Robinson (defendant) appeals from the judgments entered upon his conviction of possession of cocaine with the intent to sell or deliver and possession of a firearm by a felon, and from his plea of guilty to having attained the status of an habitual felon. On appeal, defendant argues that the trial court erred by denying his motion to suppress evidence, and committed plain error in its instructions to the jury on actual and constructive possession. After careful consideration of defendant's arguments, we conclude that the court did not err by denying his suppression motion, and that the court's instructions did not constitute plain error.

         Background

         On 26 June 2014, Detective C.T. Davis of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department applied for and was issued a search warrant authorizing him to search a house located at 3627 Corbett Street, in Charlotte, North Carolina. During the search, law enforcement officers seized two firearms, marijuana, and cocaine. Defendant was present during the search and made inculpatory statements to a law enforcement officer, admitting ownership of the firearms and the cocaine.

         On 3 November 2014, defendant was indicted for possession of cocaine with the intent to sell or deliver, possession of marijuana, maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of keeping or selling controlled substances, possession of a firearm by a person previously convicted of a felony, and having attained the status of an habitual felon. Prior to trial, the State dismissed the charges of possession of marijuana and maintaining a dwelling for the purpose of keeping or selling controlled substances. On 6 November 2015, defendant filed a motion asking the court to suppress the evidence that was seized during the search of the Corbett Street residence and the statements defendant made to law enforcement officers during the search. Defendant alleged that the search warrant was not based upon probable cause and that the statements he made "were involuntary and made as the result of mental or psychological pressure[.]" Defendant was tried before the trial court and a jury beginning on 16 February 2016. Prior to trial, the trial court conducted a hearing on defendant's suppression motion, and orally denied defendant's motion to suppress evidence. The court entered a written order on 1 March 2016.

         The State's evidence at trial tended to show, in relevant part, the following: Detective Todd Hepner of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department testified that he and several other officers executed the search warrant for the Corbett Street residence. When Detective Hepner entered the house, defendant was present, along with his wife, Armisher Glenn, and the couple's two children. In the master bedroom, Detective Hepner and another officer found a .44 caliber revolver, a shotgun, cocaine, and marijuana. Detective Charlie Davis testified that on 26 June 2014 he obtained and executed a search warrant for the house located at 3627 Corbett Street, Charlotte. He described for the jury the process of searching the house and the items that were seized. After the contraband had been located and placed on the bed, defendant was brought into the bedroom by another officer and accurately identified the location within the bedroom where each of the items had been stored. Andrew Oprysko, a chemist for the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department, testified as an expert in forensic chemistry that forensic testing had identified the material seized during the search of the Corbett Street house as cocaine.

         Detective Sidney Lackey testified that while other officers were searching the house, he interviewed defendant. During this interview, defendant admitted that the cocaine, marijuana, and firearms discovered by the law enforcement officers belonged to him. The State accepted defendant's stipulation to the fact of his prior conviction of a felony for purposes of the charge of possession of a firearm by a felon.

         Defendant also presented evidence at trial. Armisher Glenn testified that she was defendant's wife and that she had never known defendant to be in possession of cocaine or to sell drugs. Neither she nor defendant owned any firearms; however, Ms. Glenn's brother had asked to store two guns at her house and she assumed that these were the firearms seized by the police. In June of 2014, defendant and Ms. Glenn were separated due to marital difficulties; however, defendant sometimes visited the family home. On one occasion, Ms. Glenn's sister, Ms. Luba Hill, watched the children while defendant and Ms. Glenn went out to supper. Upon their return, defendant engaged in a conflict with his nephew, Ms. Hill's son. Assault charges were filed against defendant and his nephew, but were later dismissed. Ms. Hill remained angry at defendant after this altercation and made false reports about Ms. Glenn to the Department of Social Services. Ms. Hill's daughter, Kiarra Hill, testified about Ms. Hill's anger about the conflict between her son and defendant, and about statements her mother made in which she threatened to "get" an unnamed person. Candace Glenn testified that Armisher Glenn and Luba Hill were her daughters, and that Ms. Hill was very angry about the fight between defendant and Ms. Hill's son. At one point Ms. Hill was holding a "rock" of some substance and threatened to "get" defendant.

         Defendant testified on his own behalf at trial. He denied owning firearms or cocaine or selling cocaine in 2014. Defendant testified about the fight between him and his nephew and about his belief that his arrest was the result of being "set up" by Ms. Hill. He was not aware that there were drugs or firearms in the house on 26 June 2014. Although the contraband did not belong to him, defendant made inculpatory statements to Detective Lackey in order to prevent the police from arresting Ms. Glenn and placing his children in the custody of DSS. On cross-examination, defendant admitted to having prior criminal convictions, including a 2009 conviction for identity theft.

         Following the presentation of evidence, the arguments of counsel, and the trial court's instructions, the jury returned verdicts finding defendant guilty of possession of cocaine with the intent to sell or distribute and with possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. Defendant then entered a plea of guilty to having the status of an habitual felon. The trial court sentenced defendant to concurrent sentences of 83 to 112 months' imprisonment for possession of a firearm by a felon, and 73 to 100 months' imprisonment for possession of cocaine with the intent to sell or deliver. Defendant gave notice of appeal in open court.

         Standard of Review

         Defendant argues that the trial court erred by denying his motion to suppress. "The standard of review in evaluating the denial of a motion to suppress is whether competent evidence supports the trial court's findings of fact and whether the findings of fact support the conclusions of law." State v. Biber, 365 N.C. 162, 167-68, 712 S.E.2d 874, 878 (2011) (citation omitted).

         Defendant also argues that the trial court erred by instructing the jury that it could find that he was in either actual or constructive possession of the firearms and cocaine in the house, on the grounds that there was no evidence to support a finding of actual possession. As defendant did not object to this instruction at trial, we review only for plain error. Under this standard, the defendant "must demonstrate that a fundamental error occurred at trial. To show that an error was fundamental, a defendant must establish prejudice-that, after examination of the entire record, the error had a probable impact on the jury's finding that the defendant was guilty." State v. Lawrence, 365 N.C. 506, 518, 723 S.E.2d 326, 334 (2012).

         Denial of Suppression Motion

         Defendant argues that the trial court erred by denying his motion to suppress the evidence seized pursuant to the search of the Corbett Street residence.[1] Defendant's motion also sought to suppress the statements defendant made to Detective Lackey at the time of the search; however, defendant has not pursued this argument on appeal and, accordingly, it is deemed to be abandoned. See N.C. R. App. P. 28(a) ("Issues not presented and discussed in a party's brief are deemed abandoned."). The sole basis of defendant's appellate argument that the trial court erred by denying his suppression motion is his contention that, when Detective Davis executed a sworn affidavit in support of his application for a search warrant, he made "a knowingly false statement that, if omitted, would render the search warrant insufficient to establish probable cause." However, at the trial level, defendant did not argue that the statements which Detective Davis included in the affidavit were made in bad faith or reckless disregard of the truth. As a result, defendant has not preserved this issue for appellate review. Moreover, even assuming, arguendo, that this issue were preserved, defendant has failed to show that the trial court erred by denying his motion to suppress.

         It is well-established that:

The requirement that a search warrant be based on probable cause is grounded in both constitutional and statutory authority. U.S. Const. amend. IV; N.C. G.S. § 15A-244 [(2015)]. Probable cause for a search is present where facts are stated which establish reasonable grounds to believe a search of the premises will reveal the items sought and that the items will aid in the apprehension or conviction of the offender. It is elementary that the Fourth Amendment's requirement of a factual showing sufficient to constitute "probable cause" anticipates a truthful showing of facts.

State v. Fernandez, 346 N.C. 1, 13, 484 S.E.2d 350, 358 (citing Franks v. Delaware, 438 U.S. 154, 164-65, 57 L.Ed.2d 667, ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.